Dalmunzie Double Rooms

As with all the rooms at Dalmunzie, the Dalmunzie Doubles are all named after Scottish families that owned or had close ties with the hotel. Most of the Dalmunzie Double rooms have excellent views of the surrounding scenery, lawns and beyond. The majority of these rooms are Double Bedrooms although we also have several twin rooms available for sharing.

Dalmunzie Double Rooms

As with all the rooms at Dalmunzie, the Dalmunzie Doubles are all named after Scottish families that owned or had close ties with the hotel. Most of the Dalmunzie Double rooms have excellent views of the surrounding scenery, lawns and beyond. The majority of these rooms are Double Bedrooms although we also have several twin rooms available for sharing.

PRICES FROM £185 to £285

Prices vary depending on whether dinner is required in the main dining room. Guests may also prefer bar meals, which have a lower tariff. Each of our Dalmunzie rooms include the following amenities as standard:

TEA & COFFEE FACILITIES   |   LUXURY TOILETRIES   |   BOTTLED WATER

WHISKY OR SHERRY NIGHT-CAP  |  FREE WIFI  |  TELEPHONE

PRICES FROM £185 to £285

Prices vary depending on whether dinner is required in the main dining room. Guests may also prefer bar meals, which have a lower tariff. Each of our Dalmunzie rooms include the following amenities as standard:

TEA & COFFEE FACILITIES   |   LUXURY TOILETRIES   |   BOTTLED WATER

WHISKY OR SHERRY NIGHT-CAP  |  FREE WIFI  |  TELEPHONE

RATTRAY

Rattray is named after Jean Rattray who married the 3rd Laird in 1641. This is a quirky corner bedroom in the late Victorian wing with a French sleigh bed.

An inscribed lintel stone is incorporated in re-use over the door of the cottage at Leanoch Mhor. It bears the inscription ‘THE LORD DEFEND THIS HOUS’ with the initials RMT & JR and the date 1658. It is likely the stone came from the original castle of Dalmunzie with the initials referring to Robert MacIntosh the 3rd Laird of Dalmunzie and his wife Jean Rattray.

MURRAY

Murray is a medium size twin in the original hunting lodge named after Margaret Murray who married the 6th Laird in 1716. It has antique mahogany beds and overlooks the golf course towards Ben Earb.

Margaret Murray, was daughter of the Rev. John Murray, minister of Trinity Gask, a parish, adjoining Dunning, and grand-daughter of Bishop Freebairn of Edinburgh. She had five sons and five daughters, of whom only two sons and one daughter appear to have survived him.

MACTHOMAS

MacThomas is our newest Dalmunzie room located at the top of a tower stairwell. It should be noted the bedroom is heavily coombed with a small bathroom, but enjoys the best views in the hotel and has its own separate lounge making it suitable for families also. This room is for guests who like something different. ‘Tall’ guests may not find this room to their liking. The room is named after the Macthomas clan whose lands were in Glenshee and still hold their ‘gathering’ under their clan chief every two years.

RAMSAY

Ramsay is a twin annex room that interconnects with the Birkmyre tower room (view here in Tower Rooms), and as such presents the perfect set-up for families as well.

Recorded in the spellings of Ramsay and Ramsey, this ancient and noble surname is of both pre 8th century a.d., Anglo-Saxon and Scottish origins. The first bearer of the name in Scotland was Simundus de Ramsia. He was a Norman baron from Huntingdonshire in England, who was a retainer of David, Earl of Huntingdon, the brother of King Alexander 1 of Scotland (1107 – 1124). Another family of the same name have possessed lands in North East Scotland in the direct male line since the 13th Century. Not so fortunate was Sir William Ramsay who was apparently starved to death in Hermitage Castle in 1342.

ROBERTSON

Robertson is a small to medium size twin/double located in the oldest section of the building and is named after Grizel Robertson who married the 5th Laird in 1686. It looks out towards Glen Taitneach & Ben Gulabin.

This distinguished surname, with more than forty entries in the “Dictionary of National Biography” and having no less than twenty-five Coats of Arms, is today regarded as Scottish in origin, but is probably English. It is a patronymic form of the male given name Rodbert or Robert, from the pre 7th century German name “Hrodebert”.

POOLE

Poole is a good size corner twin/double in the Edwardian wing with antique dressor and views over the golf course. It is named after the current director Scott Poole.

This surname is derived from a geographical locality. ‘at the pool’ (v. Pole), from residence thereby. This common name has English as well as at least one Welsh origin. A Welsh family took this name who lived next to the Pool at Powys Castle. A German version is Puhl. The variations in the spelling of Poole include Pool, Pole, Paule, Polle, Poll and Paul. The northern region of England is heavy in the family name of Poole. Those living in Scotland are mostly in Lanarkshire county.

RATTRAY

Rattray is named after Jean Rattray who married the 3rd Laird in 1641. This is a quirky corner bedroom in the late Victorian wing with a French sleigh bed.

An inscribed lintel stone is incorporated in re-use over the door of the cottage at Leanoch Mhor. It bears the inscription ‘THE LORD DEFEND THIS HOUS’ with the initials RMT & JR and the date 1658. It is likely the stone came from the original castle of Dalmunzie with the initials referring to Robert MacIntosh the 3rd Laird of Dalmunzie and his wife Jean Rattray.

MURRAY

Murray is a medium size twin in the original hunting lodge named after Margaret Murray who married the 6th Laird in 1716. It has antique mahogany beds and overlooks the golf course towards Ben Earb.

Margaret Murray, was daughter of the Rev. John Murray, minister of Trinity Gask, a parish, adjoining Dunning, and grand-daughter of Bishop Freebairn of Edinburgh. She had five sons and five daughters, of whom only two sons and one daughter appear to have survived him.

MACTHOMAS

MacThomas is our newest Dalmunzie room located at the top of a tower stairwell. It should be noted the bedroom is heavily coombed with a small bathroom, but enjoys the best views in the hotel and has its own separate lounge making it suitable for families also. This room is for guests who like something different. ‘Tall’ guests may not find this room to their liking. The room is named after the Macthomas clan whose lands were in Glenshee and still hold their ‘gathering’ under their clan chief every two years.

RAMSAY

Ramsay is a twin annex room that interconnects with the Birkmyre tower room (view here in Tower Rooms), and as such presents the perfect set-up for families as well.

Recorded in the spellings of Ramsay and Ramsey, this ancient and noble surname is of both pre 8th century a.d., Anglo-Saxon and Scottish origins. The first bearer of the name in Scotland was Simundus de Ramsia. He was a Norman baron from Huntingdonshire in England, who was a retainer of David, Earl of Huntingdon, the brother of King Alexander 1 of Scotland (1107 – 1124). Another family of the same name have possessed lands in North East Scotland in the direct male line since the 13th Century. Not so fortunate was Sir William Ramsay who was apparently starved to death in Hermitage Castle in 1342.

ROBERTSON

Robertson is a small to medium size twin/double located in the oldest section of the building and is named after Grizel Robertson who married the 5th Laird in 1686. It looks out towards Glen Taitneach & Ben Gulabin.

This distinguished surname, with more than forty entries in the “Dictionary of National Biography” and having no less than twenty-five Coats of Arms, is today regarded as Scottish in origin, but is probably English. It is a patronymic form of the male given name Rodbert or Robert, from the pre 7th century German name “Hrodebert”.

POOLE

Poole is a good size corner twin/double in the Edwardian wing with antique dressor and views over the golf course. It is named after the current director Scott Poole.

This surname is derived from a geographical locality. ‘at the pool’ (v. Pole), from residence thereby. This common name has English as well as at least one Welsh origin. A Welsh family took this name who lived next to the Pool at Powys Castle. A German version is Puhl. The variations in the spelling of Poole include Pool, Pole, Paule, Polle, Poll and Paul. The northern region of England is heavy in the family name of Poole. Those living in Scotland are mostly in Lanarkshire county.